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NEWSLETTER

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    The days are long, the temperatures mild, and hard snow makes for easy navigation but... see more

    Spring riding conditions are like none other.  The days are long, the temperatures mild, and hard snow makes for easy navigation with little chance of actually getting handlebar stuck.  But there are certain factors to consider while out enjoyng the spring snow.

     

    What Goes Up Must Come Down

    Spring snow is often called hero snow, for when it firms up you can pretty much go anywhere you want.  Remember though what goes up, must come down and with a lack of fresh powder to slow you down you will head down a steep slope like a rocket.  If this happens do not grab a handful of brake for doing so will most likely result in your sled turning sideways followed by a rolling yard sale down the hill.  Use your engine to slow your sled down by revving your throttle and tap your brake lightly if need be.  We know that sounds odd right, but when you engage your engine it will create a hold back effect. 

    Water

    Creek Crossings - may have had some pretty reliable snow bridges across at the height of mid-season snow pack which led you to not even see a creek at all.  As the snow melts, the snow bridges will become rotten and creeks will open up into a large drop into running water. 

    Lakes- as with creeks the warm days will melt the ice pack especially where creeks enter or leave the lake.  Do not trust a lake during spring months for you can never be certain just how thick that ice truly is and for heaven’s sake don’t do donuts or whip a chitty on a lake during the spring.  That is just asking for trouble.  

    Err on the side of caution even in areas you have rode all season.  

    Overheating

    Your sled will run warmer especially on the trail ride in which can become iced up.  Put your scratchers down to cool your sled or you can  incorporate the Chainsaw method demonstrated here by Chris Brown Browner Cooling Off.  Oh ya, and don’t back up or load your sled with your scratchers down as you will snap those suckers right off. 

    Terrain Management

    We’ve already discussed hero snow, so even though you can go anywhere you really should think about managing your terrain appropriately.  Warming temperatures will stress the snow pack and can wake up sleeping dragons.  Cornices can break off causing a step down avalanche.  You’ll hear the term “low probability. High Consequence” often for when avalanches occur in the spring months they can be even more catastrophic.  Use your avalanche training and manage your terrain and group wisely.  Just because you can climb it doesn’t mean you should climb it.

    Windshields

    Remember that handy dandy trick of rolling your sled over to unstick yourself?  Ya, don’t do that when the snow is hard like concrete  for you will bust your windshield and perhaps bend your steering post. 

    Let the Snow Soften Up 

    The days are longer in the spring, so perhaps you can head out a little bit later to allow the snow to soften up a bit.  Sure you’ll be riding mash potatoes but your sled will stay cooler with the ability to throw some snow up into your coolers.

    Dress and Pack Wisely

    You may be foregoing the whole mid-layer thing for warm temperatures combined with physical activity will keep you more than warm enough on those sunny bluebird days.  Think about it though.  What if you had to spend the night on the mountain when temperatures plunged or got wet in one of those creeks we talked about.  Pack what you need to stay warm for the coldest you could encounter.  +6 in the valley can be -10 at the staging.  It is better to have too much gear and pack it on your sled than to not have enough when you need it.  

    Keep Your Gear On

    Spring snow is a lot less friendly when you land.  True story....snow hurts so keep all your gear on when riding.  Yes it’s all hip and fly to see pics of people riding in shorts and bikinis but one wrong ice bump catapults you through the air and it’s road rash city for you!  While it’s awesome to catch some rays when chilling out with your peeps, put your gear on when doing the real riding. 

    Sunny Days 

    On the topic of catching some rays, sunscreen will be your best friend.  The rays are intense on the mountain, so apply, and reapply especially if you have a Snow White like complexion.  Gingers… are you catching what we’re throwing down?  Sunscreen. 

    Sunglasses are also a great idea, for nothing quite compares to that eyeball piercing burning sensation of snow blindness. Get out those mirror lens goggles and pack a pair of shades.

    Do you have more tips to add?  We’d love to hear from you!  Keep this thread rolling on social media on our

    BCSF Facebook,  Instagram and Twitter pages!  Don’t forget to give us a like and a follow while you’re there. 

     

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    Why do you enjoy snowmobiling so much?.   That is a difficult question to answer..but we will try! see more

    The sport of snowmobiling is many things for different individuals.  Quite often we are asked “why do you enjoy snowmobiling so much?”.   That is a difficult question to answer in just one sentence for there are a multitude of ways to answer this question.

    Scenery 

    In the depths of winter, nothing is quite as breathtaking as the snow-covered views from up top.  When you are high atop a mountain you can see for miles around.  Beautiful valleys, picturesque lake views, and meandering rivers are sure to inspire.  Meandering through coniferous forests on groomed trails is such a great way to decompress while enjoying the beauty around.  Winter snowscapes are ever changing even within the same week.  Scenery is at the top of the list for many riders in the province.


    Exercise 

    In an article published by the Canadian Council of Snowmobile Organizations the findings proved what most riders know.  Snowmobiling is great exercise!

    “Researchers found that on average, riding a snowmobile used 5.6 METs. This means that a snowmobile rider is using 5.6 times as much energy while riding than if they were sitting at home watching TV. The 5.6 METS used during a typical ride is similar to the amount of energy used during downhill skiing or snow shoveling and categorizes snowmobiling as moderate intensity physical activity. It is recommended that people do 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intense physical activity (at least 3 METs) per week to maximize health benefits and to prevent a variety of health risks (Tremblay et al., 2011). Therefore, a snowmobile ride can contribute to this weekly recommendation, which will reduce the risk of developing a variety of diseases.” Read the full publication here


     

    Friendships 

    The bond developed between riders who are in a dedicated sled crew is unlike none other.  Sure, there is laughter, antics and zingers flying constantly throughout the day of adventure, but there is also something much deeper than that.  Your life is in the hands of your sled crew, and theirs in yours.  The level of trust and communication while managing terrain together in the backcountry is intense.  Even outside of the winter season, that lasting bond exists.  Your sled crew will always have your back no matter what.


    Personal Challenge  

    Snowmobiling can be as intense or as laid back as you want it to be.  Each ride is different, with a variety of unique challenges presenting at any given moment.  Do you want to learn how to nail a re-entry?  Practice makes perfect!  It may take several rides to execute technical moves, but the feeling of satisfaction when you finally get it is incredible!  Each ride your muscles become more toned, and you become more in-tune with your ride.  Confidence grows each time you face your nemesis, which may be side hilling on the throttle side of your machine, or holding a technical line in the trees.  The possibilities to grow are endless.


    Unique Wildlife Viewing

    Many would be amazed by the abundance of wildlife active in the winter months.  It can be so exciting to experience the diversity.  Sitting amongst the trees with the machines turned off and suddenly flying squirrels start gliding overhead.  The ptarmigan nestled in the snow blending in so perfectly.  Wolves, cats and sometimes even grizzly bears who have emerged from their winter slumber can get your heart pumping.  It’s important to respect wildlife, and give all animals ample space.  To learn more of what to do when you encounter wildlife while out snowmobiling in the British Columbia Backcountry please visit this article from our friends at Let’s Ride BC.  


    Sharing the sport with others 

    No matter if your teaching youth how to ride, or introducing an adult into the sport of snowmobiling, mentoring is a rewarding experience.  It can be especially exciting to introduce those who perhaps may have never even considered snowmobiling, but ironically find that they are hooked after only one ride out.  When you share the sport you grow it in a healthy way especially if you include a safety focus implemented in the outreach.


    Family Time  

    Families that play together, stay together.  Couples that ride together, stay together.  There is something solidifying in the bond created while sharing backcountry adventure together.  Suddenly kids feel that hey, Mom and Dad are actually pretty cool to hang out with and will beg to be included in the next sled-venture planned.  Snowmobiling is epic family time.


    Good for your mind

    Let’s face it, the winter months can get a bit dreary at times.  Low cloud cover, and reduced daylight hours can lead to a condition known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).  A debilitating condition for many which can be treated with vitamin D.  What better way to get some vitamin D than from mother nature herself?  Riding high above the clouds under bluebird skies while getting some endorphins flowing is the perfect prescription for SAD.  When the valley bottom is muted by cloud cover you’ll be high above the doom and gloom basking in the sun. Your mind will feel clear.


    This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the motivating factors for snowmobilers.  We’d love to hear from you!  Why do you ride? 

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article

    In this issue:

    BCSF Presidents Message

    BCSF Hires a Biologist

    Snowmobiler call to Action

    Making forever friends!

    CCSO Report

     September 25, 2019
  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    Check out the BCSF SnoScene Newsletter from SnoRiders Magazine see more

    In this issue:

    Presidents Message on Caribou Recovery

    BCSF Executive Director Update

    BCSF Excellence Awards Winners

    How to save your riding area

    Easter Seals - Adding to the quality of life

    CCSO Update

  • Article
    Your MID-WINTER 2019 BCSF SnoScene Report see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • Sights on the Future - Richard Cronier, BCSF President
    • From the Office - Crystal Durnin, BCSF Program & Marketing Coordinator
    • Elkford Warm-up Cabin - Rhonda Down, Elkford Snowmobile Association
    • Cranbrook Snowmobile Club Donations & new Groomer, Doug Williamson
    • Frostbitten Rider - Richard Cronier, BCSF President
    • Creating confident adults, Easter Seals BC/Yukon
    • BCSF Contacts (Clubs, Dealerships, Lifetime Members, etc)
    • Coast to Coast - Dennis Burns, Canadian Council of Snowmobile Organizations

  • Article
    Your FALL 2018 BCSF SnoScene Report see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • President's Report - Richard Cronier, BCSF President
    • From the Office - Donegal Wilson, BCSF Executive Director
    • Spotlight on Allan Creek - VARDA (Valemount & Area Recreational Development Association)
    • Sled 'N Snap Winners - Donegal Wilson, BCSF Executive Director
    • BC Fires take their toll - Cori Beck, President, Summit Seekers Snowmobile Club
    • Safety Campaign 2018-19, Donegal Wilson, BCSF Executive Director

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    BCSF SnoScene Newsletter mid-Winter see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • President's Report
    • From the Office
    • The FROSTBITTEN Rider
    • #slednsnap
    • February Safety Tips
    • In Memory of Bob Arnott
    • CCSO update
  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    Spring 2017 SnoScene from SnoRiders Magazine see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • President's Report
    • From the Office
    • The FROSTBITTEN Rider
    • Search & Rescue - When things go wrong
  • Article
    Fall 2017 BCSF SnoScene report is now out! see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • President's Report
    • From the Office
    • BCSF Excellence Awards Winners
    • Sled 'N Snap Photo Contest Winners
    • Making Fresh Tracks - Easter Seals BC

  • Article
    Read all about the BCSF AGM & Excellence Awards & the Revelstoke Club's 50th Anniversary! see more

    Your BC Issue of SnoRiders Magazine always includes the BCSF SnoScene Report.  A quarterly update from Team BCSF.  If you would like to read it in the magazine you can get a free subscription here otherwise download the latest BCSF SnoScene below.

    In this issue:

    • President's Report - Richard Cronier, BCSF President
    • From the Mountains - Crystal Durnin, BCSF Admin
    • Retreat to Revelstoke - Crystal Durnin, BCSF Admin
    • BCSF Excellence Awards - Crystal Durnin, BCSF Admin

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article

    In this Issue:

    Visit to Camp Winfield

    Summer Safety Update

    BMSA Parking Lot Clean up

    PS-I still love you

    Fernie Club Profile

    Click below to read the full issue

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    BCSF Member News June 2016 has a whole new look see more

    BCSF Member News has a new look

    In this issue:

    Snowarama 2015-16

    Sno-Avy Census

    Mountain Information Network (MIN)

    Frostbitten Rider

    Meet the Team

    Click below to read the full issue.

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article
    July 2016 Member News see more

    A brand new look with lots more great BCSF News

    In this Issue:

    National Trails Coalition

    Lumby/Mabel Parade History

    International Snowmobile Congress

    Confessions of a Club President

    2016/17 Sponsorship/Advertising Opportunities

    To read full issue download below

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article

    In this Issue:

    BCSF Commemorative RIde

    Upcoming Events

    Mountain Information Network (MIN)

    New ORV Act

    Download full version below

  • Donegal Wilson posted an article

    In this issue:

    Volunteer Week

    Event Highlights

    The unreachable Mountain Sledder

    Member Benefits

    Click link below to read the full issue.